Review: Miss Nightingale (The Vaults, London)

Miss Nightingale arrives in London following a number of revised productions over the years. First performed back in 2011, it’s pitched as ‘sex, scandal and showbiz 1940s style’, but does it follow up on that promise? Telling the story of a group of performers making a living amongst the background of World War 2, it…

Review: 42nd Street (Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, London)

Remember when West End musicals used to be all singing, all dancing affairs with huge casts, luscious sets and grand orchestras? You’d be forgiven for forgetting because it feels like it’s been a while since anything opened that falls into the category. Well, 42nd Street is one heck of a reminder… When this revival was announced, I’ll…

Review: The Glass Menagerie (Duke of York’s Theatre, London)

John Tiffany is having a right run of success. Not content with dominating the Olivier Awards nominations with his production of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, he’s also brought his award-winning version of Tennessee Williams’s The Glass Menagerie to London. Already having very successful runs on Broadway and at Edinburgh International Festival, it’s clear…

Review: An American in Paris (Dominion Theatre, London)

An American in Paris arrives in London following a very successful run in New York back in 2014. Based on the 1951 film of the same name, this is the first opening of a year that sees many productions harking back to a golden era of musicals. Director Christopher Wheeldon had great success when An…

Review: Ugly Lies The Bone (National Theatre, London)

Returning to the National Theatre after 2015’s hit The Motherf*cker with the Hat, director Indhu Rubasingham takes on Lindsey Ferrentino’s 2015 play Ugly Lies the Bone. Jess (Kate Fleetwood) has been on three tours of Afghanistan. Returning to her home town of Titusville in Florida, badly scarred and in pain, she must come to terms with…

Review: La Cage Aux Folles (Theatre Royal, Nottingham)

La Cage Aux Folles was originally staged in 1983, and has since been revived numerous times, most notably back in 2008 with a production by the Menier Chocolate Factory that went on to win both Olivier and Tony Awards. And while this new touring production (the first ever to do the rounds in the UK) is…

Review: The HIV Monologues (Ace Hotel, London)

The HIV Monologues is a new play by dragonflies theatre and Theatre Bench, first launched at the Kings Head theatre at the end of 2016. Returning to London at Ace Hotel in Shoreditch, this is a stripped back production that exposes the stories about living with the effects of HIV. The play, written by Patrick…

Review: RENT The Musical (St James Theatre, London)

Not many musicals manage to gather the loyal fanbase that has been afforded to RENT over its 20 year lifetime. That’s never been more obvious than during the current run at the St James Theatre, where a large portion of the audience seemed to be adorning ‘No Day But Today’ t-shirts, with ‘Moos’ at the…

Review: School of Rock (New London Theatre, London)

Remember that movie with Jack Black where he masqueraded as a teacher who manages to slip through the child protection net and enlists a bunch of kids to become rock stars? Well they’ve only gone and made a musical version of it! There wasn’t much to hate about the 2003 movie version, and apparently Andrew…

The best theatre of 2016

2016 has been a great year for London theatre. While new musicals have been somewhat lacking, there have been some very high profile revivals with the likes of Funny Girl, Dreamgirls and Sunset Boulevard. Meanwhile there have seemingly been more plays and more star name productions than ever before. And while West End Wanderer may…

Review: The Deep Blue Sea (National Theatre, London)

Following their successful production of Medea back in 2014 Carrie Cracknell and Helen McCrory have returned to the National with a new production of The Deep Blue Sea. This time around in the Lyttleton, this is another play that focuses on the desperation of a woman being preyed on by internal forces. But can this…

Review: Show Boat (New London Theatre, London)

I put this one off for a while. Starting its life in Sheffield at the Crucible, it was a surprise transfer to London after garnering such impressive reviews. With more or less the whole cast moving with it, it was originally intended to run until the start of 2017. Following early closing notices, I decided…