Review: The Glass Menagerie (Duke of York’s Theatre, London)

John Tiffany is having a right run of success. Not content with dominating the Olivier Awards nominations with his production of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, he’s also brought his award-winning version of Tennessee Williams’s The Glass Menagerie to London. Already having very successful runs on Broadway and at Edinburgh International Festival, it’s clear…

Review: Ugly Lies The Bone (National Theatre, London)

Returning to the National Theatre after 2015’s hit The Motherf*cker with the Hat, director Indhu Rubasingham takes on Lindsey Ferrentino’s 2015 play Ugly Lies the Bone. Jess (Kate Fleetwood) has been on three tours of Afghanistan. Returning to her home town of Titusville in Florida, badly scarred and in pain, she must come to terms with…

Review: The HIV Monologues (Ace Hotel, London)

The HIV Monologues is a new play by dragonflies theatre and Theatre Bench, first launched at the Kings Head theatre at the end of 2016. Returning to London at Ace Hotel in Shoreditch, this is a stripped back production that exposes the stories about living with the effects of HIV. The play, written by Patrick…

Review: The Deep Blue Sea (National Theatre, London)

Following their successful production of Medea back in 2014 Carrie Cracknell and Helen McCrory have returned to the National with a new production of The Deep Blue Sea. This time around in the Lyttleton, this is another play that focuses on the desperation of a woman being preyed on by internal forces. But can this…

Review: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child (Palace Theatre, London)

Did anyone actually expect Harry Potter on stage to be half decent? Yes, 12 months ago we all queued for hours in the hope of bagging some tickets as early in the run as possible. Yes, it comes off the back of a hugely successful series of books and (arguably) iconic movies. But, wizards and magic…

Review: Cleansed (National Theatre, London)

What’s it all about? Your guess is as good as mine, and I’ve actually seen it. Essentially over the course of an hour and a half we watch a man named Tinker slowly torture a group of strangers who are all confined in an asylum-like environment. A gay couple, Carl and Rod: one who won’t admit…

Review: Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom (National Theatre, London)

What’s it all about? Despite the name of the play this isn’t so much about the 1927 song Black Bottom but more about the events surrounding the recording of it. Taking place within the recording studio, it focuses on Ma Rainey’s band, their relationships with one another, and the power struggle between Ma Rainey and studio…

Review: A Christmas Carol (Noel Coward Theatre, London)

What’s it all about? If you’re not familiar with the premise then you are sincerely missing out (Muppet Christmas Carol is the ultimate Christmas film!) but essentially it’s about an old miserable git called Scrooge. He hates Christmas and takes great pleasure from ripping off the poor. In an effort to cheer him right up,…

Review: Photograph 51 (Noel Coward Theatre, London)

What’s it about? The professional life of Dr Rosalind Franklin, an English chemist and X-Ray crystallographer. The play, here directed by Michael Grandage, focuses on her journey to discovering the makeup of DNA, her relationships with her fellow scientists, the battles she faced as a result of her gender, and her eventual death at the age…

Review: Our Country’s Good (National Theatre, London)

Set in 1788, Our Country’s Good looks at a group of convicts sent to Australia to colonise the land, along with the soldiers who travelled with them. A debate about the best way to improve civilisation starts an argument that ends in Second Lieutenant Ralph Clark agreeing to put on a play to give the convicts…

Review: Splendour (Donmar Warehouse, London)

In a presidential palace, a dictator’s wife Micheleine, her best friend Genevieve, a sassy photographer Kathryn, and a kleptomaniac translator Gilma pace the room. The photographer is here to photograph Micheleine and her husband, but he is late. On the outside, an uprising is happening; firebombs and riots on the streets, the north is revolting….

Review: The Vote (Donmar Warehouse, London)

You have to hand it to Josie Rourke and James Graham, they don’t make things easy. Kicking off the partnership with Privacy at the Donmar last year, they’ve followed it up with The Vote. A 90 minute production (or 87 minutes and 50 seconds last night owing to the missing ad break) that includes a…