Review: Miss Nightingale (The Vaults, London)

Miss Nightingale arrives in London following a number of revised productions over the years. First performed back in 2011, it’s pitched as ‘sex, scandal and showbiz 1940s style’, but does it follow up on that promise? Telling the story of a group of performers making a living amongst the background of World War 2, it…

Review: 42nd Street (Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, London)

Remember when West End musicals used to be all singing, all dancing affairs with huge casts, luscious sets and grand orchestras? You’d be forgiven for forgetting because it feels like it’s been a while since anything opened that falls into the category. Well, 42nd Street is one heck of a reminder… When this revival was announced, I’ll…

Review: An American in Paris (Dominion Theatre, London)

An American in Paris arrives in London following a very successful run in New York back in 2014. Based on the 1951 film of the same name, this is the first opening of a year that sees many productions harking back to a golden era of musicals. Director Christopher Wheeldon had great success when An…

Review: La Cage Aux Folles (Theatre Royal, Nottingham)

La Cage Aux Folles was originally staged in 1983, and has since been revived numerous times, most notably back in 2008 with a production by the Menier Chocolate Factory that went on to win both Olivier and Tony Awards. And while this new touring production (the first ever to do the rounds in the UK) is…

Review: RENT The Musical (St James Theatre, London)

Not many musicals manage to gather the loyal fanbase that has been afforded to RENT over its 20 year lifetime. That’s never been more obvious than during the current run at the St James Theatre, where a large portion of the audience seemed to be adorning ‘No Day But Today’ t-shirts, with ‘Moos’ at the…

Review: School of Rock (New London Theatre, London)

Remember that movie with Jack Black where he masqueraded as a teacher who manages to slip through the child protection net and enlists a bunch of kids to become rock stars? Well they’ve only gone and made a musical version of it! There wasn’t much to hate about the 2003 movie version, and apparently Andrew…

Review: Show Boat (New London Theatre, London)

I put this one off for a while. Starting its life in Sheffield at the Crucible, it was a surprise transfer to London after garnering such impressive reviews. With more or less the whole cast moving with it, it was originally intended to run until the start of 2017. Following early closing notices, I decided…

Review: The Bodyguard (Dominion Theatre, London)

Let me be completely blunt about one thing: 95% of the people watching The Bodyguard on any given night are there to see one thing and one thing only, and that’s somebody belting out Whitney Houston songs. So it really doesn’t matter how good the story may or may not be, or how well acted it…

Review: Aladdin (Prince Edward Theatre, London)

Aladdin had a rocky start. First, it gave things a go in Seattle with a limited run that had distinctly average reviews. Then came a pre-Broadway try-out in Toronto with the same cast that was marginally better but still failed to wow critics. And by the time it reached the Great White Way (still with the…

Review: Funny Girl (Savoy Theatre, London)

Starting at Menier Chocolate Factory, this transfer follows a string of high profile revivals at the Savoy Theatre. Funny Girl, starring woman of the moment Sheridan Smith, charts the rise of wannabe actress Fanny Brice and her relationship smooth talker and gambler Nick Arnstein. Direction by Michael Mayer – On the whole there’s some fine direction by…

Review: Sunset Boulevard (London Coliseum, London)

Sunset Boulevard is being dubbed as the ‘Theatrical Event of the Year’ after returning to the West End for the first time since it’s original run at the Adelphi Theatre back in 1993. Telling the story of ageing actress Norma Desmond, it explores her relationship with failing writing Joe Gillis, and her eventual demise. In this new production,…

Review: War Horse (New London Theatre, London)

What’s it all about? One man and his dog is so last century; now, it’s all about one man and his horse. This is the story of Albert, a young farm boy, who befriends a horse named Joey after his father has a moment of compulsive shopping disorder down the market and buys a horse…